Fort Warangal

About Project

Warangal fort is 12-km from Hanumakonda, built by King Ganapathi in 13th century and completed by his daughter Rudrama Devi, in 1261 A.D., The fort has two walls, with the traces of the third. The fort has 45 towers and pillars spread over a radius of 19 km, and a temple of Mother Earth called ‘Swayambhudevi Alayam’ in the middle.

Description
  • The Warangal Fort was a huge construction with three distinct circular strongholds surrounded by a moat. Four paths with decorative and lofty gateways known as Keerthi Thorana or Hamsa Thorana, set according to the cardinal points, lead to the center where a huge Shiva Temple (Swayambhu Gudi) once existed. The archaeological remains through the explored ground plan of the Swayambhu temple suggests the huge dimensions of the temple, as corroborated by the contemporary work of Kridabhiramamu.
Description

Fort Warangal or Medaram Jatara is a tribal festival of honouring the goddesses celebrated in the state of Telangana, India.The Jatra begins at Medaram in Tadvai Mandal in Warangal district.[2] It commemorates the fight of a mother and daughter, Sammakka and Saralamma, with the reigning rulers against an unjust law. It is believed that after Kumbha Mela, the Medaram jatara attracts the largest number of devotees in the country. An estimated 10 million people gathered in 2012It is celebrated in Medaram during the time the goddesses of the tribals is believed to visit them. Medaram is a remote place in the Eturnagaram Wildlife Sanctuary, a part of Dandakaranya, the largest surviving forest belt